WTF!

May 14, 2014

026501a2High wispy clouds and a full moon wide-eyed this early Wednesday on California’s north coast — and quiet, too.
Maybe heat brings on noise discreetly, blocking sound from human ears — we’re forecast for 80-plus degrees today, the peak in a “heat wave” currently hanging over the West Coast.

A bit further south, record temperatures are slated for today in the Bay Area: “We’re looking at fried grapes on the vine,” said weather service forecaster Diana Henderson. “Even going to the coast won’t provide any real relief.”
That’s total bullshit!

And it is fuckin’ bullshit because the seashore is always way-fuckin’ cooler.

(Illustration: Pablo Picasso’s ‘Tete d’homme du XVIIeme siecle,’ found here).

Why do I feel such intense feelings why I use “dirty” language — when I cuss? Maybe the words feel so good.
The late, great George Carlin discusses the best cuss word ever — the F-bomb:

It’s a great word, fuck, nice word, easy word, cute word, kind of.
Easy word to say.
One syllable, short u. Fuck. You know, it’s easy.
Starts with a nice soft sound fuh ends with a kuh.
Right?
A little something for everyone.
Fuck.

It’s a heavy.
It’s one that you have toward the end of the argument.
Right? You finally can’t make out.
Oh, fuck you man. I said, fuck you.
Stupid fuck. Fuck you and everybody that looks like you. man.
It would be nice to change the movies that we already have and substitute the word fuck for the word kill, wherever we could, and some of those movie cliches would change a little bit.
Madfuckers still on the loose.
Stop me before I fuck again.
Fuck the ump, fuck the ump, fuck the ump, fuck the ump, fuck the ump.
Easy on the clutch Bill, you’ll fuck that engine again.

All that heavy breathing about cuss words ain’t right, and apparently, it ain’t that healthy either.
A new study reveals that when I say, “Fuck you!” in a loud voice, I just might be emotional — swearing is an ‘aroused state,’ and might be good for you.
Amy Zile, one of the authors of the research funded by British Psychological Society’s 2013 Undergraduate Research Assistantship Scheme:

“There is still uncertainty as to why people swear.
Is it due to not being articulate and low IQ or it is a form of emotional expression?
If it is a form of emotional expression then understanding the processes involved is an important part of understanding human emotion.
Our study found that when we raised people’s emotional arousal level they became more proficient at swearing such that they were able to produce a greater number of different swear words and expressions in a one-minute period.
This provides experimental support for the theory that swearing is emotional language.”

Charlotte Lytton at The Daily Beast adds some shit to cussin’ and world events:

While the U.S’ love affair with curse-laden lingo rolls on, this attitude isn’t necessarily indicative of the rest of the western world.
Arbiter of all that is sane and balanced, Putin, is the latest nay-sayer to jump aboard the profanity-banning bandwagon, having ruled that four of Russia’s naughtiest words will incur a fine starting July 1 when used in plays or movies.
The terms ebat (to fuck), khuy (cock), pizda (cunt), and blyad (whore) will also be outlawed from television broadcasts, public performances and books under new legislation aimed at “protecting and developing language culture,” the Kremlin said.
Now, it may be a bit of a jump to draw a link from the statutory whims of Russia’s leader to society’s penchant for profanities, but this is (possibly) further evidence that cussing is still viewed pretty negatively by many.
Clearly, not everyone is on board with a laissez-faire take on cursing, but, as Dr. Benbarek elucidates, “In addition to the psychological function of swearing, we mustn’t forget its social functions. Swearing is important for creating close relationships, friendship or intimacy with others, and bonds can be formed around it.”
A friendship starting, pain-decreasing, Kremlin-bothering pass for dropping F-bombs?
Count me fucking in.

Fuckin’ yeah!

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