‘…tell the truth about the global warming stuff and all of that’

July 27, 2016

picasso1Deep-fog and way-moist air this early Wednesday on California’s north coast, as we continue the summer of heat.

Asshole Jim Inhofe talking some heinous shit last week (Think Progress yesterday):

“You know, our kids are being brainwashed? I never forget because I was the first one back in 2002 to tell the truth about the global warming stuff and all of that. And my own granddaughter came home one day and said “Popi (see “I” is for Inhofe, so it’s Momi and Popi, ok?), Popi, why is it you don’t understand global warming?” I did some checking and Eric, the stuff that they teach our kids nowadays, you have to un-brainwash them when they get out.”

(Illustration: Pablo Picasso’s ‘Harlequin Head,’  found here).

Inhofe is a hard-case climate-change denier, yet as his own state of Oklahoma right now is domed by record-breaking heat, which also happens to cover much of America.
In the future, whatever that be, shit-sticks like Inhofe could be charged with crimes against humanity — in a space of time, that granddaughter could eventually grow to be ashamed of him.
And it’s coming quick — the heat increase this year has startled even climate-watching people — per Reuters, also yesterday:

Record temperatures in the first half of 2016 have taken scientists by surprise despite widespread recognition that extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and intense, the director of the World Climate Research Program said.
The earth is on track for its hottest year on record with June marking the 14th straight month of record heat, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said last week.
Temperatures recorded mainly in the northern hemisphere in the first six months of the year, coupled with an early and fast Arctic sea ice melt and “new highs” in heat-trapping carbon dioxide levels, point to quickening climate change, it said.
In a further announcement on Tuesday, the U.N. agency said it would examine whether a temperature of 54 degrees Celsius (129 degrees Fahrenheit) reported in Kuwait last Thursday was a new high for the eastern hemisphere and Asia.
“What concerns me most is that we didn’t anticipate these temperature jumps,” said David Carlson, director of the WMO’s climate research program, late on Monday.
“We predicted moderate warmth for 2016, but nothing like the temperature rises we’ve seen,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by telephone from Geneva.
“Massive temperature hikes, but also extreme events like floodings, have become the new normal,” Carlson said.
“The ice melt rates recorded in the first half of 2016, for example — we don’t usually see those until later in the year.”

Little reports like this are sometimes the most scary.

Added fright: some good way-way long-term news, though, even Inhofe’s granddaugher’s granddaughter won’t benefit — a study, published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience, reports the discovery of evidence suggesting there’s a natural release valve — a built-in upper limit to the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, found in pre-history geological findings.
From yesterday’s UPI:

“It’s long been thought that when the planet warms, as it did during the PETM, the rate of rock weathering on land, which absorbs CO2 from the atmosphere, increases,” Donald E. Penman, a postdoctoral fellow and geologist at Yale University, said in a news release.
“This draws down CO2 and cools the planet back down again.”

Yet the caveat:

For those worried about global warming, the discovery may sound like good news.
While Penman and his colleagues believe man-made climate change will trigger a similar weathering-and-CO2-absorption cycle, the process won’t happen quickly or soon enough to stave off the more devastating consequences of global warming.
“If the PETM is any guide, it will take tens of thousands of years,” Penman said.

And we’re back to this morning, and heat breaking-out all over…

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