Word

December 14, 2013

test

(Illustration: Children escorted away from Sandy Hook Elementary School, Dec. 14, 2012, found here).

A lot of coverage today on the anniversary of the Newtown, Connecticut, “shooting” — now a near-normal word for any type public firearms exhibition-event, whether it be a mall, a barbershop, Navy base, or, school.
Two weeks ago, Connecticut’s AG issued its final report on the incident, and cited this: “The evidence clearly shows that the shooter planned his actions, including the taking of his own life, but there is no clear indication why he did so, or why he targeted Sandy Hook Elementary School,” the report states.

Meanwhile, in the most-latest “shooting” yesterday at Arapahoe High School in suburban Denver, Colorado, this new normal appeared to come of age — a horrific reality of survival. Although authorities have yet to pin-point an exact motive, apparently the shooter, an 18-year-old student at the school, was after one teacher specifically. The kid killed himself with the shotgun he used. A 15-year student was critically wounded, two others injured.
Sadly, history played a positive role — via the San Francisco Chronicle this morning:

Authorities evacuated hundreds of students in an orderly procession — a demonstration of aggressive security measures developed by police and schools following the 1999 shooting at Columbine, some 8 miles west of Arapahoe High.
All of the students there started school after Columbine and grew up in a security-conscious era.
After that tragedy, police across the country developed “active shooter” training in which responding officers rush toward gunfire — and step over bodies and bleeding victims if necessary — to stop the gunman.
“The first deputy sheriffs and police officers that were on scene immediately entered the school to engage the shooter if they could locate that individual and keep the other students safe,” Robinson said.
“This kid, the officers went right to him literally within minutes,” said Gov. John Hickenlooper.
“That is a world of change from the way response used to happen.”

And some shit remains the same: In a scene that was eerily reminiscent of the Columbine tragedy, hundreds of students could be seen fleeing the school and then approaching police with their hands up to be searched.

Response to firearm-bloodletting is good, but what about prior to the response, is there “a world of change” in the US obsession/crazy-notion of guns, guns and way-more guns?
The student-shooter at Arapahoe High School was supposedly mad at his “debate” instructor.
Availability of firearms might be only a procedural question, of course, given the right word.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.